The News Agency of the International Society for Krishna Consciousness

Articles tagged as Mongolia

  • Kirtan In The Gobi Desert, Mongolia

    In 1996, several foreign ISKCON devotees who were visiting Mongolia, held kirtan in the streets of the capital, Ulaanbaatar. They were immediately caught and deported. For almost 20 years now the streets of the country have remained silent of the singing of Krishna's holy names. ISKCON's renewed status as a religious organization, however, now allows Indradyumna Swami and his group to sing freely everywhere with prior permission (A video by Ananta Vrindavan).

  • Devotees Visit an Orphanage in Mongolia

    Much of the Mongolian population lives below the poverty line and many families struggle just to get by. It is common, especially in the capital Ulaanbaatar, to see children who have been abandoned. They are typically a product of social upheaval caused by alcoholism, rapid urbanization and poverty. Little is known of the history of most of the 80 children in the orphanage Indradyumna Swami and his group visited in Erdenet. Many were abandoned at birth in hospitals, or left simply on the side of the road. Because of such backgrounds they were especially appreciative of the devotees' visit.

  • Into The Heart Of Mongolia

    Mongolia’s vast steppe is home to one of the world’s last surviving nomadic cultures. Situated between China and Russia, the Mongolian steppe remains mostly intact, and its nomadic way of life has been largely unchanged for generations. Some herding customs alive today pre-date the era of Genghis Khan. Slowly, however, the steppe’s landscape is changing, as more and more of its nomadic population move to urban areas in search of education, employment, and modern conveniences. On ISKCON-devotees 8-hour drive to Erdenet for their first public program in the city, they passed many nomadic people herding their cows, horses and sheep.

  • Devotees Chant with Mongolian Orphans

    Much of the Mongolian population lives below the poverty line and many families struggle just to get by. It is common, especially in the capital Ulaanbaatar, to see children who have been abandoned. They are typically a product of social upheaval caused by alcoholism, rapid urbanization and poverty. Little is known of the history of most of the 80 children in the orphanage Indradyumna Swami and his group visited in Erdenet. Many were abandoned at birth in hospitals, or left simply on the side of the road. (A video by Ananta Vrindavan.)

  • Kirtan in the Gobi Desert, Mongolia

    In 1996, several foreign devotees who were visiting Mongolia, held kirtan in the streets of the capital, Ulaanbaatar. They were immediately caught and deported. For almost 20 years now the streets of the country have remained silent of the singing of Krishna's holy names. ISKCON's renewed status as a religious organization, however, now allows devotees to sing freely everywhere with prior permission. (Video by Ananta Govinda)

  • Indradyumna Swami Tours Mongolia

    Dubbed “The Land of the Eternal Blue Sky,” Mongolia is a large and rather wild country divided between deserts, steppes, and mountains. About fifty-three per cent of the population are Buddhist, and about forty per cent continue to live the traditional nomadic lifestyle.ISKCON devotees first came to Mongolia in the 1990s.